Cub Scout Nutrition

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Cub Scout Nutrition Belt Loop & Pin resources include the Cub Scout Nutrition Worksheet Adobe Acrobat PDF
with cross-references for related Cub Scout Tiger, Wolf, Bear, and Webelos requirements.
Cub Scout Nutrition makes a great Art night!   Prev  -  Next 

Nutrition
Belt Loop and Pin
Nutrition Academics Belt Loop
Image:a-Nutrition.jpg
Nutrition Academics Pin
(line drawing, actual pins are color)

The Cub Scout Nutrition belt loop and pin are a part of the Cub Scout Academics and Sports Program. Tiger Cub, Wolf, Bear, and Webelos Scouts may earn this award in a Family, Den, Pack, school, or community setting. Tiger Cubs must be always accompanied by their Adult partner.


Contents



Cub Scout Nutrition requirements

Belt Loop Requirements

Complete these three requirements:

  1. Make a poster of foods that are good for you. Share the poster with your den.
  2. Explain the difference between a fruit and a vegetable. Eat one of each.
  3. Help prepare and eat a healthy meal of foods that are included in a food pyramid. (With your parent’s or adult partner’s permission, see http://www.mypyramid.gov.)

Academics Pin Requirements

Earn the Nutrition belt loop, and complete five of the following requirements:

  1. Make a poster that shows different foods that are high in each of the vitamins. Using your poster, explain to your den or family the difference between a vitamin and a mineral and the importance of each for a healthy diet.
  2. Read the nutrition label from a packaged or canned food item. Learn about the importance of the nutrients listed. Explain what you learned to your den or family.
  3. Make a list of diseases that can be caused by a diet that is poor in nutrition.
  4. Talk with your school cafeteria manager about the role nutrition plays in the meals your school serves.
  5. With an adult, plan a balanced menu of breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for your family for a week.
  6. Make a list of healthy snack foods. Demonstrate how to prepare two healthy snacks.
  7. With an adult, go grocery shopping. Report to your den or other family members what you learned about choosing good foods to eat.
  8. Demonstrate how to safely prepare food for three meals.
  9. Demonstrate how to store leftover food to prevent spoilage or contamination.
  10. Help with a garden. Report to your den or family about what is growing in the garden and how you helped. Show a picture of or bring an item harvested from your garden.
  11. Visit a farm or ranch. Talk with the owner about how the farm or ranch produces food for families.
  12. Explain how physical exercise works with nutrition in helping people be fit and healthy. Demonstrate three examples of good physical activity.

Eating a balanced diet means eating foods that are good for you and that give your body the vitamins and other nutrients it needs to stay healthy.


The official source for the information shown in this article or section is:
Cub Scout Academics and Sports Program Guide, 2010 Edition (BSA Supply No. 34299)

The text of these requirements is locked and can only be edited
by an administrator.
Please note any errors found in the above requirements on this article's Talk Page.


Notes

  1. Details on earning a Cub Scout Sports or Academic pin or belt loop multiple times


Requirement resources

Worksheet A FREE workbook for Cub Scout Nutrition is available here! Adobe Acrobat PDF
with the maps, charts, links, diagrams, and checklists you need!
Or click here to print just the Cub Scout Nutrition requirements.
meritbadge.org has PDF and DOC versions of
Boy Scout merit badge workbooks,
Webelos workbooks, and Cub Scout workbooks.


Related awards

See also

Cub Scout Leader portal
Webelos Den Leader portal


External links

Personal tools
language