Conservation

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| style="padding: 0.25em 0.5em;" | '''The ''official'' source for the information shown in this article or section is:<br>[http://www.scouting.org/BoyScouts/AdvancementandAwards.aspx ''Conservation Pamphet, 1937 Printing''']
| style="padding: 0.25em 0.5em;" | '''The ''official'' source for the information shown in this article or section is:<br>[http://www.scouting.org/BoyScouts/AdvancementandAwards.aspx ''Conservation Pamphet, 1937 Printing''']
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== Notes ==
 
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== External links ==
 
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[[Category:Discontinued Merit Badges]]
 

Revision as of 19:03, October 1, 2012

Conservation merit badge
Status: Discontinued BSA Advancement ID: unavailable
Created: 1911 Original/new/replaced:
Discontinued: 1952 Replaced by:

Contents

[[Category:Discontinued {{{group}}} merit badges]]

The Conservation merit badge was one of the original 57 merit badges issued by the Boy Scouts of America in 1911.

Conservation is a discontinued merit badge. It was once of the original merit badges, but was replaced by Wildlife Management in 1952. That badge was then replaced by Conservation of Natural Resources in 1966 which was then replaced by Environmental Science in 1974.

Merit badge requirements

1. Know the principle natural resources of his locality, county and state, and give the essence of any conservation laws affecting them.
2. Know for his region the principle game birds, animals, and fish and the seasons during which they are protected, how they are protected, and what are the results of the protection.
3. Describe in detail one game bird, animal and fish common in his locality, and tell of its habits of living, feeding, and rearing its young.
4. Present at least two photographs taken by himself of some phase of conservation of natural resources, and be able to describe thoroughly the conservation involved.
5. Present evidence of having directly assisted conservation by some deed, such as fighting a forest fire; checking erosion; planting trees; helping restock streams with fish; posting or distributing conservation notices; planting wild rice or other duck feed; feeding birds in winter; stopping stream and river pollution.
6. Know the conservation laws in general of his state.


Boy Scout Requirements, ({{{1}}}) Edition The official source for the information shown in this article or section is:
Conservation Pamphet, 1937 Printing
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