Pathfinding (Centennial merit badge)

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The [[Pathfinding]] merit badge was one of the [[Original Merit Badges|original 57 merit badges]] issued by the Boy Scouts of America in 1911; it was discontinued in 1952. It was re-released, <u>for 2010 only</u>, for the [[2010 Historic Merit Badge Program|Boy Scouts of America's "Centennial" celebration]].
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The [[Pathfinding]] merit badge was one of the [[Original merit badges#Original 57 merit badges introduced in 1911|original 57 merit badges]] issued by the Boy Scouts of America in 1911; it was discontinued in 1952. It was re-released, <u>for 2010 only</u>, for the [[2010 Historic Merit Badge Program|Boy Scouts of America's "Centennial" celebration]].
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Current revision

Pathfinding (Centennial merit badge) merit badge has been discontinued. (See discontinued merit badges.)


Pathfinding "Centennial" merit badge
Status: Discontinued
Released: 2010 BSA Advancement ID: 140
Retired: 2010 Requirements Revision: 2010

Contents


The Pathfinding merit badge was one of the original 57 merit badges issued by the Boy Scouts of America in 1911; it was discontinued in 1952. It was re-released, for 2010 only, for the Boy Scouts of America's "Centennial" celebration.


Pathfinding (Centennial merit badge) requirements for 2010 only

  1. In the country, know every lane, bypath, and short cut for a distance of at least two miles in every direction around the local scout headquarters; or in a city, have a general knowledge of the district within a three-mile radius of the local scout headquarters, so as to be able to guide people at any time, by day or by night.
  2. Know the population of the five principal neighboring towns, their general direction from his scout headquarters, and be able to give strangers correct directions how to reach them.
  3. If in the country, know in a two mile radius, the approximate number of horses, cattle, sheep, and pigs owned on the five neighboring farms; or, in a town, know, in a half-mile radius, the location of livery stables, garages and blacksmith shops.
  4. Know the location of the nearest meat markets, bakeries, groceries, and drug stores.
  5. Know the location of the the nearest police station, hospital, doctor, fire alarm, fire hydrant, telegraph and telephone offices, and railroad stations.
  6. Know something of the history of his place; and know the location of its principal public buildings, such as the town or city hall, post-office, schools and churches.
  7. Submit a map not necessarily drawn by himself upon which he personally has indicated as much as possible of the above information.



The official source for the information shown in this article or section is:
BSA's Historical Merit Badge Program, 2010 Edition (BSA Supply No. N/A)

The text of these requirements is locked and can only be edited
by an administrator.
Please note any errors found in the above requirements on this article's Talk Page.


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