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== Suggestions ==
== Suggestions ==
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Place you suggestions for dates here:
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Place your suggestions for additional dates on the [[Template_talk:Calendar|discussion]] page.
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== Current list of Dates ==
== Current list of Dates ==
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Following is a list of the current date that will be displayed. These lists are locked, and can only be edited by MeritBadgeDotOrg administrators. Please place suggestions for dates that you would like added to the list under the '''Suggestions''' section above.
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Following is a list of the current dates that will be displayed. (These lists are locked and can only be edited by an administrator.)
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===January===
===January===
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{{{{PAGENAME}}/January}}
===February===
===February===
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===March===
===March===
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===April===
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===May===
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===June===
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===July===
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===September===
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===October===
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===November===
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Current revision

Contents

Suggestions

Place your suggestions for additional dates on the discussion page.

Current list of Dates

Following is a list of the current dates that will be displayed. (These lists are locked and can only be edited by an administrator.)

January

  • January 1st – Happy New Year!
  • January 12, 1910 – Girl Guides created in England
  • January 8, 1941 – Baden-Powell dies in Nyeri, Kenya, where he spent the last few years of his life
  • January 24, 1908 – Scouting for Boys is first published
  • January 1941 – Air Scouts created (later became Air Explorers then Aviation Explorers, then Aviation Career Exploring as part of the Learning for Life organization)

February

  • February 8, 1910Boy Scouts of America founded in Washington, D.C., by W. D. Boyce.
  • Scout Sunday/Sabbath – The Boy Scouts of America designates the Sunday that falls on or precedes February 8 as Scout Sunday. However, some chartered organizations celebrate on another day. For instance, the Presbyterian Church and United Methodist Church celebrate Scout Sunday on the second Sunday of February so as to not conflict with Communion Sunday and in the Jewish faith Scout Sabbath is celebrated on the Saturday after February 8 as Scouting Anniversary Day.
  • February 22, 1857 – Birth of Lord Robert Stephen Baden-Powell, "BP", the founder of Scouting.
  • February 22, 1889 – Birth of Olave Baden-Powell, wife of "BP", World Chief Guide.
  • February 28, 2008 – First World Scout Winter Games

March

Princeton Scouts who were assigned to carry Woodrow Wilson's baggage.
Princeton Scouts who were assigned to carry Woodrow Wilson's baggage.
Scouts holding men back with staves, 1 of 2.
Scouts holding men back with staves, 1 of 2.
Scouts holding men back with staves, 2 of 2.
Scouts holding men back with staves, 2 of 2.
  • March 3, 1913 – Presidential Inauguration and Woman Suffrage parade of 1913. Boy Scouts were initially tasked with carrying Woodrow Wilson's baggage, and assisting behind the scenes. As Slate magazine reported,
"Between 5,000 and 8,000 marchers faced crowds of raucous male spectators in town for the inauguration. These onlookers assaulted the protesters physically, blocked their way, and yelled insults. At least 100 marchers were injured and hospitalized."
"While the police were at best unprepared and at worst unsympathetic to the protesters’ plight, the unexpected heroes of the march were 1,500 Boy Scouts who had volunteered to help law enforcement during the inauguration."
"The official Scout magazine, Boys’ Life, featured a four-page article about the Scouts’ actions during the parade in its April 1913 issue. The magazine reported that the Scouts were asked to present themselves in full uniform with their staves (part of their official dress). While the police initially told the Scouts to stay behind their lines, Boys’ Life reported, the crowd was soon too much for law enforcement."
"[Police] were soon begging the scouts to help them and borrowing their staves…[Scouts] found the task of keeping the way open for the parade was, in itself, tremendous, but in addition they had to render first aid in hundreds of incidents…There is record that one boy handled sixteen cases of fainting."
"A Senate subcommittee appointed to investigate the poor treatment of the marchers heard multiple mentions of the Scouts. Mrs. Keppel Hall, a demonstrator from Dayton, Ohio, told the senators:"
"[The Scouts] were working so hard. I noticed them all along the line, and was interested in them because they appeared to be doing all the work. Even those small boys were succeeding in holding back the crowd whenever they pressed themselves forward."
"As a young organization (founded only three years earlier), the Boy Scouts of America relished the good press. The Boys’ Life article concluded:"
"Washington and its respectable visitors will not soon forget the spectacle of boys in the uniform that stands for learning the principles of good citizenship actually restraining grown men from acting the part of brutes."
National reports that each boy involved receive a medal inscribed, "In Grateful Acknowledgement of Duty Well Done. Washington DC March 3 1913".

April

May

June

  • June 1, 2008National Trails Day
  • June 15, 1916 – U.S. President Woodrow Wilson signs a bill incorporating the Boy Scouts of America, making them the only American youth organization with a federal charter.
  • June 25, 1977 – Olave Baden-Powell, wife of Robert Baden-Powell, former Chief World guide, one of the only two recipients of the gold silver fish, died at Birtley House, Bramley in Surrey, UK. Her ashes were taken to Kenya to be buried with her husband.
  • June 30, 1937 – First National Jamboree, held at Washington, DC. Ran from June 30-July 9. Was to have been in 1935, but was canceled due to a polio epidemic.
  • June 1923 – First recorded use of the word "woggle" (early Scouts tied a knot in their neckerchief) in the June issue of the Scout magazine. The word ring was used in early editions of the Scouting handbook Scouting for Boys until 1929 when Baden-Powell changed it in the 14th edition: "It [the scarf] may be fastened at the throat by a knot or woggle, which is some form of ring made of cord, metal or bone, or anything you like."

July

August

  • August 1-9, 1907Robert Baden-Powell holds the first (experimental) Scouting encampment at Brownsea Island. He began setting camp up on July 29, 1907.
  • August 6, 1900William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt, the father of American Scouting, is born in Denmark.
  • August 8, 1909 – Scout camp half-held on the Training Ship Mercury (there was only room for 50 boys but it had earlier been advertised as a camp for the top 100 boys, so half camped on land then they switched half-way through), which led to the formation of Sea Scouts.
  • August 21, 1912 – Arthur Rose Eldred becomes the first Eagle Scout in the history of Boy Scouts of America.
  • August 22, 1908 – First official Scout camp at Humshaugh, England. The Scouting movement didn't officially exist during the 1907 Brownsea Island camp -- this was the first camp attended by registered Scouts.

September

September 8-19, 1919 – The first Wood Badge course is held at Gilwell Park, England.

October

  • Girls to join Scouting – On this date, the Boy Scouts of America Board of Directors unanimously approved to welcome girls into its iconic Cub Scout program and to deliver a Scouting program for older girls that will enable them to advance and earn the highest rank of Eagle Scout.
  • The third full weekend in OctoberJamboree On The Air-Jamboree On The Internet (20 to 22 October 2017, 19 to 21 October 2018, 18 to 20 October 2019, 16 to 18 October 2020

November

November 9, 1992William "Green Bar Bill" Hillcourt, a father of American Scouting, dies in America.

December

  • December 16, 1773 – Boston Tea Party
  • December 16, 1916 – Wolf Cub Section started for boys too young to be Boy Scouts
  • December 19, 1777 – Winter at Valley Forge begins
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