Template:Metalwork/req

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# Read the safety rules listed in the ''Metalwork'' merit badge pamphlet. Describe to your counselor how to be safe while working with metal. Because this merit badge offers four options, show your counselor which additional safety rules apply to the discipline you choose and discuss them with your counselor.
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1. Read the safety rules for metalwork. Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5.
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# Do the following:
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#:a. Define the term '''native metal'''.
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2. Define the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then do the following:
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#:b. Define the term '''malleable'''.
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#:c. Define the term '''metallurgy'''.
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:a. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.
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#:d. Define the term '''alloy'''.
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:b. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
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#:e. Name two '''nonferrous''' alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers, and name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.
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:c. Describe how to work-harden a metal.
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#:f. Explain the term '''ferrous''', and name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
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:d. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal.
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#:g. Describe how to '''work–harden''' a metal.
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#:h. Describe how to '''anneal''' a non-ferrous and a ferrous metal.
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3. Do the following:
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# Do the following:
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#:a. Put a 45-degree bend in a small piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
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:a. Work-harden a piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
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#:b. Work-harden another piece of the same sheet brass or sheet copper. and then put a 45-degree bend in it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
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:b. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it, and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
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#:c. Soften the same bent, work hardened piece by annealing it and then try to remove the 45–degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
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:c. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.
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#:d. Join two small pieces of scrap metal using a hammered rivet. Repeat the process using a pop rivet.
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#:e. Using a flatlock seam, join two pieces of scrap metal together with either lead-free solder or silver solder.
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4. Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.
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#:f. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.
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#:g. Using metal cans, practice using the basic metalworking tools and techniques by making at least two tasteful objects that require cutting, bending, and edging.
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5. After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.
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# Do ONE of the following:
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#:a. Visit an experienced sheet metal mechanic, tinsmith, coppersmith, jeweler, founder or a blacksmith at his or her workshop. You may select a skilled hobbyist or a professional. Ask permission to see the tools used and to examine examples of the work made at the shop. Inquire about the level of education required to become an apprentice craftsman.
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:'''a. Option 1 &ndash; Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith'''
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#:b. If you have (or your counselor has) access to the internet, explore metalworking occupations by conducting a Web search. With your counselor’s help and guidance, find at least five metalworking–related Web sites. Print a copy of the web pages and discuss them with your counselor.
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#:When conducting your Web search, use keywords such as ''metallurgy, metalwork, spinning metal, metal fabrication, steel fabrication, aluminum fabrication, casting metal, pattern making, welding, forge welding, blacksmith, art metal, Artist Blacksmith Association of North America, farrier, brazing, goldsmith, machinist,'' or ''sheet metal mechanic''.
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::(1) Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
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# After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.
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::(2) Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
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#:'''a. Option 1 Sheet Metal Mechanic / Tinsmith'''
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::(3) Make two objects out of 24- or 26-gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing.
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#::1. Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
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:::(a) One object also must include at least one riveted component
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#::2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.
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:::(b) If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.
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#::3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 24- or 26–gauge sheet metal. Use a metal that is appropriate to the object’s ultimate purpose.
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#:::a. Both objects must be constructed using culling, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing
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:'''b. Option 2 &ndash; Silversmith'''
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#:::b. One object must include at least one riveted component
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#:::c. If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.
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::(1) Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools.
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#:'''b. Option 2 - Silversmith'''
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::(2) Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
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#::1. Name and describe the use of the basic tools used by a silversmith.
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::(3) Make two objects out of 18- or 20-gauge sheet copper. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Both objects must include a soldered joint. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead-free pewter.
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#::2. Create a reasonably accurate hand-drawn sketch of two tasteful objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch.
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:::(a) At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
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#::3. Using patterns provided either by your counselor or made by you, make at least two tasteful objects out of 18- or 20–gauge sheet Copper. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead free pewter.
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:::(b) At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
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#:::a. At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
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:::(c) Clean and polish your objects.
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#:::b. At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
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#:::c. Both objects must include a soldered joint.
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:'''c. Option 3 &ndash; Founder'''
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#:::d. Clean and polish your objects.
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#:'''c. Option 3 Founder'''
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::(1) Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two-piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.
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#::1. Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two–piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.
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::(2) Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
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#::2. Create a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to cast in metal. Include the height, width, and length on the sketch.
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::(3) Make two molds, one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one you have made yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself. ''Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.''
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#::3. Do the following:
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:::(a) Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.
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#:::a. Using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one made by yourself, make two molds. Position the pouring gates and vents yourself. ''Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.''
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:::(b) Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using the mold that you have made.
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#:::b. Make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor and make a casting using the mold you have made. Use lead free pewter when casting each mold.
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#:::c. Remove all evidence of gates, vents, and parting-line flash from your castings.
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:'''d. Option 4 &ndash; Blacksmith'''
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#:'''d. Option 4 - Blacksmith'''
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#::1. Name and tell the use of the basic tools used by a blacksmith.
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::(1) Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools.
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#::2. Make a reasonably accurate sketch of two tasteful objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch.
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::(2) Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
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#::3. Using low–carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, perform the following exercises:
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::(3) Using low–carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, perform the following exercises:
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#:::a. Draw out by forging a taper.
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:::(a) Draw out by forging a taper.
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#:::b. Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.
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:::(b) Use the horn of the anvil by forging a '''U'''-shaped bend.
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#:::c. Twist steel by placing a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
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:::(c) Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
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#:::d. Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L–shaped bend.
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:::(d) Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an '''L'''-shaped bend.
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#::4. Using low-carbon steel at least ¼ inch thick, make at least two tasteful objects that require hot-forging.
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::(4) Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, make the two objects you sketched that require hot-forging. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin.
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#:::a. Include a decorative twist on one object.
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:::(a) Include a decorative twist on one object.
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#:::b. Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
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:::(b) Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
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#::5. Preserve your work from oxidation.
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:::(c) Preserve your work from oxidation.
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<noinclude>{{ReqFooter}}[[Category:Protected Boy Scout requirement pages]]</noinclude>
<noinclude>{{ReqFooter}}[[Category:Protected Boy Scout requirement pages]]</noinclude>

Current revision


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1. Read the safety rules for metalwork. Discuss how to be safe while working with metal. Discuss with your counselor the additional safety rules that apply to the metalwork option you choose for requirement 5.

2. Define the terms native metal, malleable, metallurgy, alloy, nonferrous, and ferrous. Then do the following:

a. Name two nonferrous alloys used by pre-Iron Age metalworkers. Name the metals that are combined to form these alloys.
b. Name three ferrous alloys used by modern metalworkers.
c. Describe how to work-harden a metal.
d. Describe how to anneal a nonferrous and a ferrous metal.

3. Do the following:

a. Work-harden a piece of 26- or 28-gauge sheet brass or sheet copper. Put a 45-degree bend in the metal, then heavily peen the area along the bend line to work-harden it. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point in this unworked piece of metal.
b. Soften the work-hardened piece from requirement 3a by annealing it, and then try to remove the 45-degree bend. Note the amount of effort that is required to overcome the yield point.
c. Make a temper color index from a flat piece of steel. Using hand tools, make and temper a center punch of medium-carbon or high-carbon steel.

4. Find out about three career opportunities in metalworking. Pick one and find out the education, training, and experience required for this profession. Discuss this with your counselor, and explain why this profession might interest you.

5. After completing the first four requirements, complete at least ONE of the options listed below.

a. Option 1 – Sheet Metal Mechanic/Tinsmith
(1) Name and describe the use of the basic sheet metalworking tools.
(2) Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
(3) Make two objects out of 24- or 26-gauge sheet metal. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Construct these objects using a metal that is appropriate to the object's ultimate purpose, and using cutting, bending, edging, and either soldering or brazing.
(a) One object also must include at least one riveted component
(b) If you do not make your objects from zinc-plated sheet steel or tin-plated sheet steel, preserve your work from oxidation.
b. Option 2 – Silversmith
(1) Name and describe the use of a silversmith's basic tools.
(2) Create a sketch of two objects to make from sheet silver. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
(3) Make two objects out of 18- or 20-gauge sheet copper. Use patterns either provided by your counselor or made by you and approved by your counselor. Both objects must include a soldered joint. If you have prior silversmithing experience, you may substitute sterling silver, nickel silver, or lead-free pewter.
(a) At least one object must include a sawed component you have made yourself.
(b) At least one object must include a sunken part you have made yourself.
(c) Clean and polish your objects.
c. Option 3 – Founder
(1) Name and describe the use of the basic parts of a two-piece mold. Name at least three different types of molds.
(2) Create a sketch of two objects to cast in metal. Include each component's dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
(3) Make two molds, one using a pattern provided by your counselor and another one you have made yourself that has been approved by your counselor. Position the pouring gate and vents yourself. Do not use copyrighted materials as patterns.
(a) Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using a mold provided by your counselor.
(b) Using lead-free pewter, make a casting using the mold that you have made.
d. Option 4 – Blacksmith
(1) Name and describe the use of a blacksmith's basic tools.
(2) Make a sketch of two objects to hot-forge. Include each component’s dimensions on your sketch, which need not be to scale.
(3) Using low–carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, perform the following exercises:
(a) Draw out by forging a taper.
(b) Use the horn of the anvil by forging a U-shaped bend.
(c) Form a decorative twist in a piece of square steel.
(d) Use the edge of the anvil to bend metal by forging an L-shaped bend.
(4) Using low-carbon steel at least 1/4-inch thick, make the two objects you sketched that require hot-forging. Be sure you have your counselor's approval before you begin.
(a) Include a decorative twist on one object.
(b) Include a hammer-riveted joint in one object.
(c) Preserve your work from oxidation.


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